Kenya has long been synonymous with safari (the Swahili word for travel), unless you are a water-sports enthusiast. In that case, it’s the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean, home to seven national marine parks alive with coral gardens, multi-colored fish and sea turtles, that will call your name.

The Serena Beach Resort overlooked the Indian Ocean with the grace of an Arabian palace.

Always ready to embrace the best of all worlds, I decided that after a twenty-four hour journey across two continents in airplanes booked to capacity to take me there, I would first catch my breath on the coast before starting my exploration of the famous games reserves of the country.

 

 

Shanzu Beach

The guest accommodations were nestled in lush tropical gardens.

Built along the idyllic stretch of palm-fringed sand of Shanzu Beach, some 20 kilometers (12 miles) north of Mombasa, the Serena Beach Resort rose from the shoreline with the intriguing elegance of an ancient Swahili town. Inspired by the rich architectural tradition of the East African Coast, the property was divided in a number of whitewashed two- and three-story buildings nestled in lush tropical gardens.

An ornamental fish pond bordered  the plaza.

The public areas had the feel of an Arabian palace, with oriental furnishing and  rugs. The trellised terraces of its main restaurant opened onto a large central fountain, and further down toward the beach, an ornamental fish pond filled with aquatic plants bordered a plaza designed to recall a Swahili town marketplace.

 

My room opened onto a shaded balcony.

The guest accommodations had intricately carved wooden balconies and fretwork screens overlooking courtyards shaded by exuberant bougainvilleas and frangipane trees in bloom. They were clustered along narrow stone-paved alleyways winding toward the ocean. But before I would  enjoy the lure of the sea, my travel-wearing body yearned for a visit to the Maisha Spa.

 

Maisha Spa

The hallway was oulined with frangipani blossoms.

Located in a remote  corner of the gardens, the Spa was a heaven of tranquil luxury within the seclusion of brightly whitewashed walls. Although mine had been an impulse visit, the staff kindly managed to schedule an immediate massage for me. Shortly thereafter, clad in a plush white cotton robe and smart leather sandals, I was following an attendant along a marble floor hallway outlined with frangipani blossoms.

The serene treatment rooms induced total relaxation.

My treatment suite was equally inviting, with an oversized, state-of-the art massage bed and exotic fretwork sliding doors that opened onto a beautifully landscaped private courtyard. Diffused natural light bathed the entire area. And best of all, my therapist was as exceptional as the surrounding. A steel-fingered magician, she delivered a memorable treatment that had all the therapeutic benefits of a deep-tissue massage without the usual discomforts. Now fully rejuvenated, I was ready to investigate the shore activities.

Mombasa Marine National Reserve

Local sailors proposed ngawala trips to the reef.

The Serena Resort  was blessed with an expansive frontage of lawn and soaring palm grove overlooking the silky sands and gentle surf of the Mombasa Marine National Reserve, a 80 square mile (210 square kilometers) environment of crystalline waters and pristine beaches. In the distance, a roll of whitecaps announced the famed coral reef laying a short 15-minute boat ride away. Friendly local sailors in their ancient ngawalas  (traditional local trimorants made from the trunks of mango trees) and mtumbwis  (small dug out canoes) were always ready to negotiate a price to ferry visitors to the reef.

The reef was alive with colorful fish darting around the coral.

I couldn’t resist trying out a ngagwala ride, just for fun, but I booked a “proper” dive boat excursion the next day, for an organized morning of snorkeling. The sea was perfectly calm, crystalline and warm. It was a thrill to float above the busy life of the reef. Along with a couple of varieties of coral, I spotted a number marine species, including sea urchin, crabs, starfish, octopus, sea cucumbers, more varieties of fish than I could identify and even a couple of the sea-turtles in the distance, for a memorable snorkeling experience.

An Endangered Turtle Sanctuary

Yet, the most significant memory of my stay occurred later, on the last evening of my visit. Earlier on, I had expressed interest in the hotel’s involvement in a project aimed to protect the nesting sites of the endangered migratory Green Sea Turtle.

The Serena Resort’s beach was a nesting sanctuary for the endangered migrating Green Turtles.

As I was leaving the restaurant after dinner, I was intercepted by a staff member. A cache of Green Sea Turtle eggs had been salvaged that afternoon from an exposed area up the coast. They were about to be resettled in a safe nest on the property’s sanctuary. Did I care to participate? Did I ever! I was immediately escorted to the site and introduced to Dr. David Olendo, the biologist in charge of the project. Under his guidance, I spent the next hour digging in the sand and helping to deposit some 140 eggs into their new nest, in the precisely correct position to ensure safe hatching. I regret to this day that I couldn’t be there sixty days later to see the hatchlings make their precarious run to the sea. but I like to think that another fortunate Resort guest did enjoy the experience.

Good to Know

  • Getting there — By Air: Moi International Airport was the international airport deserving Mombasa. It offered several daily connecting flights from Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, the main entry point for international visitors to Kenya. Moi International is 30 kilometers (18 miles) west of Shanzy Beach. Transportation to and from the airport could be easily pre-arranged through the property. 
  • Staying there — The Serena Resort and Spa was a five star luxury resort featuring 164 rooms in two- and three-level structures scattered village-style within 25 hectares (62 acres) of lush gardens, along a 2 kilometer (1.25 mile) beach. The beach was part of the Mombasa Marine National Park and Preserve.
  • Activities — In addition to its gorgeous beach, the Resort featured a free-form Olympic-length swimming pool located in the center of the palm grove overlooking the sea.  All manners of water-sports activities including diving, snorkeling and wind-surfing could be arranged through the Resort. Additionally complimentary recreational activities included a fully equipped health club, with tennis and squash courts.

Location, location, location!

Shanzu Beach, Kenya