It’s Day Two of my Tripology off-road adventure through the mountains of Central Greece. We congregate in the parking lot of the Amelia Hotel in Delphi to carry on our departure routine. Yoav Barashi, the leader of our Tripology Adventures caravan, reviews the day’s itinerary, we eagerly pile our luggage and ourselves with into our designated cars (mine is # 3 and Tim Campbell is at the wheel today) and proceed with an all around radio check. The morning sun is dissipating the last of the early mist as we meander down a country road toward the sea. I marvel at the serenity of the bucolic setting, until Nikos Manolis, our lead driver (and a noted figure in the Greek rally racing community) leads us onto a narrow gravel road.

From Breathtaking to Hair-raising

Greece - Pindus - Lake Mormos

A first glance at Lake Mormos

This is Bauxite Way, Yoav explains, named for the aluminum ore mine on our right. And by the way, we are now on one of the best-known stages of the famous Acropolis Rally, which is part of the European Rally Championship schedule. The best time recorded on this 24 kilometer (15 mile) uphill, tightly winding trail is 13 minutes (that’s 110 kilometers-or 70 miles- per hour!). Mercifully, Tim takes it considerably slower but we are still stirring impressive clouds of red dust in our wake. Back on paved road high on the Giona Ridge, we catch our first sight of the turquoise waters of the Mormos Reservoir far below. We unanimously call for a photo op stop.

Greece. Pindus, Lidoriki wisteria.

In Lidoriki, main street balconies vanish under a riot of wisteria blooms.

The road snakes steeply downhill toward Lidoriki, a postcard perfect little village with just a few shops along a main street not much wider than our Jeep and lined with stone facades overwhelmed by riotous wisteria in full bloom. We stop for refreshments on the platia, the village square that is the heart of every Greek village before resuming our roller-coaster ride, uphill once more. The narrow rocky trail hugs the rock face to the right. The scenery goes from breathtaking to hair-raising as I consider the precipitous drop to our left and the conspicuous absence of guardrail. This is the wild, off-the-beaten-paths Greece I wanted to experience, but right now I wish for something a bit tamer.

Bonding with boulders

Greece - Pindus.Boulder.

Jessica telling the boulder who’s boss.

Greece - Pindus. Ridge view.

Picnic view at the top of the ridge.

A jarring rock-against-metal grinding sound interrupts my musings as our car comes to a decisive stop. The lead vehicle and Cars # 1 and 2 are already out of sight, Car # 4 has not yet caught up. I reach for the radio (as the non-driver in our car, I am the designated radio operator) searching for the appropriate words to admit that we have just bonded with a boulder. Deep breath. “Number Three to Lead. Do you read me?”. “Go-ahead,” Yaov prompts. “We have … hit a rock,” I squeak. Jessica, the unflappable Coloradoan in Car # 4 takes over with a businesslike “Getting out to assess and will report.” Within minutes Nikos’ big Land Rover comes to nose to nose halt with our Jeep (How did he manage to turn around and go past two cars so quickly?). The rock in question is firmly embedded into our front right wheel-well. Nikos and Yaov spring into action. A winch materializes from the front bumper of the land cruiser, the rock is lassoed with the capable assistance of Jessica and just as it is being dragged out of the way a nimble rally emergency vehicle zips to a stop behind us to offer a hand.

Greece - Pindus. Bee-hives

Tending hives under the Judas Trees.

We are off again in short order. When we reach the top of the ridge, we are greeted by Izhar, co-founder of Tripology Adventures, a copious picnic already laid-out and jaw-dropping mountain vistas to the horizon. An hour later, the camping stoves, plastic stools and assorted remains of our picnic stowed into his 4WD, Izhar zooms down the trail with a “see you tonight” wave. We start our descent at a much more sedate pace. Other than lots of goats, the occasional herd of shaggy sheep and now a pair of beekeepers tending to their hives in a roadside orchard, we have barely come across anyone on these remote roads.

Greece - Pindus. Sheep.

On these mountain roads, sheep have the right of way.

But by now I’ve realized that we are never left to our own devices. In addition to our leaders Yoav and Nikos, Izhar is always one step ahead of us, test driving our itinerary to make sure it is still passable (between weather and rock slides, conditions can change fast in these mountains), catering the occasional al fresco meal and checking that hotels and restaurants are ready for us. And there is road support at our back, ready to intervene in case of mishap. How else could the blue mosquito with its crew of two and the spare wheel strapped to its roof have found us so quickly? We didn’t need them this time, but it’s good to know they are here.

We dine and stay at the Elatou that night, a cozy country hotel in the mountain village Ano Chora surrounded by dense forests of fir and chestnut trees.

Into the clouds

Greece - Pindus. Agrafa

These remote mountains kept the Moors invasion at bay for four centuries.

The weather is drab and chilly as we leave Ano Chora the next morning, and even more so when we stop for coffee in Arachova, a village precariously perched on a mountainside. We are in the Evrytania now, a pristine region of steep, thickly forested slopes and rushing streams that have earned it a reputation for splendid scenery and the moniker of “the Switzerland of Greece”. But for now, clouds are blotting out the landscape and the going is slow. Yoav seizes the moment to tell us of the harsh history of the area and the fiercely independent people who left the cities to take refuge in these mountains; and succeeded in maintaining their autonomy and culture through the 400 year Ottoman occupation of Greece.

Greece - Pindus. Lake Evinos.

Lake Evinos fills a series of deep canyons.

The clouds finally part and we are treated to a bird’s-eye view of the brilliant green waters of Lake Evinos meandering at the bottom of deep canyons, and hills dotted with the bright fuchsia Judas trees in bloom. Our next stop is Krikelo, where after lunch at the cheerful Tavern Antigoni, there is time for walk across the platia to the village church. Behind its humble exterior of pale local stone, it is a treasure trove of gilded byzantine-style icons and dripping crystal chandeliers.

Greece - Pindus. Krikelo church.

Crystal chandeliers and rich icons light up the village church.

One more stop in Megalo Horio, a exceptionally picturesque village clinging so closely to the mountain that it appears to rise in layers from the platia, before heading for Karpenisi, a small town (population 13,000) best known for its popular ski resort. After two days spent exploring remote wilderness, there is something a bit incongruous to being greeted with welcome drinks at check-in and bellman service at the five-star Montana Hotel and Spa. But one look at my room with its king-size canopy bed and spacious seating area opening onto a large deck with a panoramic view of the mountains (plus an oversized whirlpool bath in my bathroom) and I am quite happy to re-enter the lap of twenty first century luxury. We have dinner in a tiny nearby village in a family-run restaurant where Izhar and Yoav are greeted like longtime friends. I never caught the name of the place, but I will long remember the warmth of the welcome and the freshly caught brook trout grilled to perfection.

The Tripology Fairies

We find our vehicles freshly washed and lined in formation when we leave the restaurant. It reminds me that we haven’t once had to stop to refuel since we left Athens. Tripology fairies must be servicing the cars while we eat or sleep. All this seamless planning and attention to details make our expedition feel so easy I would travel anywhere with these guys.

Tripology Adventures is an Israel-based road travel company that has been leading 4WD self-drive caravans across remote, culturally rich regions of Europe, Africa and Asia for over two decades. Tripology Adventures, www.tripologyadventures.com, email:info@tripologyadventures.com, or call 888-975-7080.

A Few Souvenirs

Location, location, location!

Karpenisi, Greece

Karpenisi, Greece

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